Acupuncture, Traditional Chinese Medicine, and NAET Allergy Elimination for Allergies

 

According to the CDC allergies are the 6th leading cause of chronic illness in the U.S. with an annual cost of over $18 billion. More than 50 million Americans suffer from allergies each year. There is no doubt that allergies are on the rise affecting men, women, and children.

Regardless of whether you suffer from seasonal allergies, allergies to dust, food, chemicals, or environmental there are several natural alternatives for the treatment of allergies.

 

Acupuncture & Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM)

Acupuncture and TCM have a long history of helping with the symptoms of seasonal allergies. It has been shown to help with sinus congestion, watery eyes, asthma, sneezing, and headaches.

Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) involves stimulating the body’s life force (Qi) by placing small, thin needles directly under the skin (acupuncture). When a person’s Qi grows stagnant or experiences other problems, he or she is more susceptible to disease and illness. Therefore, correcting this problem through acupuncture will naturally deter allergies, asthma and other common problems. Your acupuncturist may also recommend dietary and lifestyle changes, and herbal medicine to speed your recovery.

Nambudripad’s Allergy Elimination Technique (NAET)

NAET was developed over 30 years ago by Dr. Devi Nambudripad M.D., D.C., L.Ac, Ph.D. It is rapidly being recognized as an effective way to treat allergies of all types. By utilizing a series of kinesiology, energy balancing, and acupuncture NAET has been shown to help a wide range of pathologies. Including: ADD/ADHD, Autism, anaphylaxis, autoimmune diseases, food allergies, seasonal allergies, pain, digestive dysfunction, chemical sensitivities, EMF sensitivities. NAET is unique in that it reboots the body so that it no longer recognizes the sensitivity. This is quantifiable through IgE and IgG allergy bloodwork.

 

In a 2011 study, Biomedical Analyses of a Holistic Peanut Allergy Treatment: NAET , participants with peanut allergies had their blood tested (prior to and after treatment) for specific IgE and IgG levels as well as for the inflammation marker tryptase. After the entire treatment protocol was completed each participant was given an oral peanut challenge and was monitored closely. No significant reaction was observed; only minor complaints of temporary oral tingling, pain, anxiety, and nervousness. Blood pressure was also monitored during the oral challenge, and remained constant for every participant.

 

References

https://www.naet.com/pdfs/peanutAllergy.pdf

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26073163

 

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